Posts Tagged ‘Albino Penguin’

I’m Dreaming Of A White Penguin

February 6, 2016

Penguins are one of the more popular and easily recognizable members of the animal kingdom. They’ve been studied and observed so much that you probably think you’ve seen it all when it comes to our adorable, flightless friends. Well, Penguin Post readers, guess again.

When a team of scientists working for National Geographic were exploring the Lindbald region of northern Antarctica, they came across a remarkably a very rare penguin specimen.  An Albino chinstrap penguin.   02-mutant-blonde-penguin.jpg

Blonde (not albino) Penguin

January 16, 2012

Last week the Penguin Post reported the discovery of an albino Chinstrap penguin, but we stand corrected.  He’s leucistic—not albino—which means his coloring is muted but he still has pigmented eyes, making camouflage and fishing more difficult. Yet despite these disadvantages, blonde penguins are regularly found breeding normally.Penguins’ black and white coloring is essential to their survival, so exactly why has this blonde penguin survived?

The penguin was spotted at the edge of the South Shetland Islands by tourists and naturalist David Stephens. They were all aboard the National Geographic Journey to Antarctica. Stephens, of the Lindblad Expeditions cruise company, which is running the cruise, wrote on his blog: “Despite colorful variation in facial patterns, all penguins are decked in the standard black and white pattern. This is no accident. Counter-shading camouflage is so necessary to diving birds that all are fundamentally alike. But to our astonishment we found an exception. At the water’s edge stood a leucistic Chinstrap. This bird was whitish, but not quite an albino. Instead, it had pigmented eyes and a washed-out version of a Chinstrap’s normal pattern. Many wondered about this unusual bird’s chances of success. While odd coloration may make fishing a bit more difficult, leucistic birds are regularly found breeding normally.” The leucistic penguins have a reduced level of pigmentation but still have pigmented eyes, according to National Geographic. Penguins’ countershaded dark and white colors camouflage them from above from predators. Stephens wrote on his blog, “Many wondered about this unusual bird’s chances of success. While odd coloration may make fishing a bit more difficult, leucistic birds are regularly found breeding normally.”  So good to you luck blonde, have a long, wonderful, waddling life.

Rare Albino Penguin Sighting

January 11, 2012

The Penguin Post has learned that David Stephens, a naturalist aboard Lindblad Expeditions’ National Geographic Explorer ship, photographed this rare white Chinstrap penguin on Monday on Antarctica’s Aitcho Islands.

“At the water’s edge stood a leucistic Chinstrap,” Stephens wrote in the ship’s daily expedition report. “This bird was whitish, but not quite an albino. Instead, it had pigmented eyes and a washed-out version of a Chinstrap’s normal pattern. Many wondered about this unusual bird’s chances of success. While odd coloration may make fishing a bit more difficult, leucistic birds are regularly found breeding normally.” A leucistic bird has reduced pigmention, unlike a bird with albinism, which is a lack of skin pigment. The standard black-and-white coloring found on penguins serves as camouflage that aids the bird in fishing, so it’s unusual to find a penguin without it. “It is a fairly rare phenomenon,” said Dyan deNapoli, a penguin expert and author of “The Great Penguin Rescue,” who added that the rate of leucism in Chinstrap penguins is about 1 in 146,000. “When I was in Antarctica, I never saw one, and I saw a lot of penguins.”